JaVa
   

List of Figures

Basics of Java Programming

Screenshot-1
Screenshot-2
Screenshot-3
Screenshot-4
Screenshot-5
Screenshot-6
Screenshot-7
Screenshot-8
Screenshot-9
Screenshot-10
Screenshot-11
Screenshot-12
Screenshot-13

Arrays and Strings

Screenshot-1
Screenshot-2
Screenshot-3
Screenshot-4
Screenshot-5
Screenshot-6
Screenshot-7
Screenshot-8
Screenshot-9
Screenshot-10
Screenshot-11

Multiple Classes

Screenshot-1
Screenshot-2
Screenshot-3
Screenshot-4
Screenshot-5
Screenshot-6
Screenshot-7
Screenshot-8

Packages, Utilities, and Error Handling

Screenshot-1: Testing our own package
Screenshot-2: Running an app from a JAR archive
Screenshot-3: Running an applet from a JAR archive
Screenshot-4: Using the ArrayList class
Screenshot-5: Finding and removing from an ArrayList
Screenshot-6: Using the LinkedList class
Screenshot-7: Using the Stack class
Screenshot-8: The exception is not caught
Screenshot-9: The exception is now caught by the try/catch block
Screenshot-10: Catching our own exception
Screenshot-11: Simple assertion

Stream I/O

Screenshot-1: Console input example
Screenshot-2: The tic-tac-toe game
Screenshot-3: How our output file looks
Screenshot-4: The data has been loaded back in
Screenshot-5: Using serialization

Threads

Screenshot-1
Screenshot-2
Screenshot-3
Screenshot-4
Screenshot-5

apps and Applets

Screenshot-1: Our basic app window
Screenshot-2: Our basic applet
Screenshot-3: Our applet in AppletViewer
Screenshot-4: Passing parameters to an applet
Screenshot-5: Java look and feel

Graphics

Screenshot-1
Screenshot-2
Screenshot-3
Screenshot-4
Screenshot-5
Screenshot-6
Screenshot-7
Screenshot-8
Screenshot-9
Screenshot-10
Screenshot-11
Screenshot-12
Screenshot-13
Screenshot-14
Screenshot-15
Screenshot-16

Using the Mouse and Keyboard

Screenshot-1
Screenshot-2
Screenshot-3
Screenshot-4

Using Sound and Music

Screenshot-1: Simple applet sound example
Screenshot-2: Playing sampled sound example
Screenshot-3: Streaming audio example
Screenshot-4: MIDI example
Screenshot-5: Sound manager example

Game Programming Techniques

Screenshot-1
Screenshot-2
Screenshot-3
Screenshot-4
Screenshot-5
Screenshot-6
Screenshot-7
Screenshot-8
Screenshot-9: Radius of a circle
Screenshot-10: A triangle
Screenshot-11: The magic of Pythagoras
Screenshot-12: Before and after intersection
Screenshot-13: Before and after intersection
Screenshot-14: The Game framework (showing Sample Screen)
Screenshot-15: The four screens in the framework demo
Screenshot-16: The Tile Scroller
Screenshot-17: The Tile Scroller with 32x64 pixel tiles instead of 32x32 pixel tiles
Screenshot-18: The Tile Walker
Screenshot-19: The player's tile sheet
Screenshot-20
Screenshot-21
Screenshot-22: Another approach to the player's tile sheet
Screenshot-23: Tile collisions
Screenshot-24
Screenshot-25
Screenshot-26: The red man's big brother Bungle
Screenshot-27: A mini Tile Walker app
Screenshot-28: A small 10x10 tile map

Introduction to GUI

Screenshot-1: The JButton Example app
Screenshot-2: The JTextField Example app
Screenshot-3: The label below the JTextField is updated to show the name the user entered into the JTextField.
Screenshot-4: The Image Button Example app
Screenshot-5
Screenshot-6: Custom GUI example

Introduction to Databases

Screenshot-1: A visual interpretation of a database
Screenshot-2: Visualization of an inefficient method for storing user contact information
Screenshot-3: Visualization of an efficient method for storing user contact information
Screenshot-4: How the relate_contacts_to_user table looks after the addition of Jenny's contacts
Screenshot-5: user_table containing some sample data

Using SQL with MySQL

Screenshot-1: Select the typical install option.
Screenshot-2: The MySQL directory structure
Screenshot-3: The contents of the bin directory
Screenshot-4: A blank window?!
Screenshot-5: Viewing the current running tasks
Screenshot-6: The MySQL console client
Screenshot-7: The Run dialog
Screenshot-8: The Registry Editor
Screenshot-9: The RunServices folder (key)
Screenshot-10: Pop-up menu
Screenshot-11: The Edit String dialog box
Screenshot-12: Viewing existing databases
Screenshot-13: Creating a database
Screenshot-14: The mydata database has been added to the list.
Screenshot-15: Dropping a database
Screenshot-16: Database listing after the DROP command
Screenshot-17: The myinfo database is now visible in the console after using the SHOW DATABASES command.
Screenshot-18: Here the userinfo table can be seen as part of our database.
Screenshot-19: Describing the userinfo table
Screenshot-20: Modifying a column name
Screenshot-21: Description of the updated userinfo table
Screenshot-22: Now the age column is of type INT rather than TINYINT.
Screenshot-23: Dropping a field from a table
Screenshot-24: As you can see, the e-mail field has now been removed.
Screenshot-25: After dropping the userinfo table, we have an empty database.
Screenshot-26: Creating the dmlexample database
Screenshot-27: Creating our sample table
Screenshot-28: Inserting a single row of data
Screenshot-29: Viewing the new row in the table
Screenshot-30: Inserting multiple rows in a single statement
Screenshot-31: Now we have four rows in the table.
Screenshot-32: The password field has been updated in all of the rows.
Screenshot-33: Updating only a single row
Screenshot-34: Conditional updates
Screenshot-35: Deleting a single row
Screenshot-36: Conditional deleting
Screenshot-37: Deleting all the data from a table
Screenshot-38: Inserting our new data into the sampletable table
Screenshot-39: Using the wildcard with a SELECT statement
Screenshot-40: Retrieving only a single column
Screenshot-41: Retrieving multiple columns
Screenshot-42: Selecting a single row
Screenshot-43: Selecting a single row with specified columns
Screenshot-44: The two- password problem!
Screenshot-45: Using LIKE with a SELECT statement
Screenshot-46: Our three tables in the gamedata database
Screenshot-47: Our data in the playerdata table
Screenshot-48: Our data in the relatefriends table
Screenshot-49: Finding out a player's friend list
Screenshot-50: Finding out a player's enemy list
Screenshot-51: Finding more data about an enemy
Screenshot-52: Using a join statement
Screenshot-53: The data to import in Windows Notepad
Screenshot-54: Importing data from a text file
Screenshot-55: The imported data in our playerdata table
Screenshot-56: Entering the data in Microsoft Excel
Screenshot-57: Saving as a tab-delimited text file
Screenshot-58: The excel.txt file in Notepad
Screenshot-59: The command-line window (MS-DOS)
Screenshot-60: Importing a text file into MySQL

Using the JDBC

Screenshot-1: Our source directory structure
Screenshot-2: JDBC Example 1
Screenshot-3: This shows the data in MySQL, which has been inserted from our Java console app.
Screenshot-4: This screen shot shows the output from code listing 16-3.
Screenshot-5: Our skeleton app
Screenshot-6: Our skeleton app with GUI objects in place
Screenshot-7: Our scoredata table in our highscore database
Screenshot-8: The final Highscore app
Screenshot-9: Output from our metadata example, using the firsttest database
Screenshot-10: The prepared statement has inserted three rows into our database.

Introduction to Networking

Screenshot-1: Finding out your IP address
Screenshot-2: The TCP echo server
Screenshot-3: The TCP echo client
Screenshot-4: The UDP echo server
Screenshot-5: The UDP echo client
Screenshot-6: The game server console app
Screenshot-7: Everyone having fun playing "I'm a circle!" or not
Screenshot-8: Joel then felt lonely as everyone moved away from him.

Introduction to NIO Networking

Screenshot-1: ByteBuffer example
Screenshot-2: Blocking server (after a client has connected)
Screenshot-3: Blocking client
Screenshot-4: Non-blocking server (after client has been executed)
Screenshot-5: Client

Bonus Chapter: A Tour of the Swing GUI

Screenshot: The JLabel example app
Screenshot: The JButton example app
Screenshot: The Image Button example app
Screenshot: The JTextField example app
Screenshot: The label below the JTextField is updated to show the name the user entered.
Screenshot: Using the JPasswordField
Screenshot: Using the JTextArea
Screenshot: As you can see, the text in the JTextArea was output to the console when we clicked the button.
Screenshot: Using the JScrollPane with the JtextArea
Screenshot: The JComboBox example app
Screenshot: Using the JCheckBox
Screenshot: This shows that we have successfully retrieved the state of the JCheckBox.
Screenshot: Changing the way the JCheckBox is displayed with custom images
Screenshot: Using the JRadioButton
Screenshot: This shows the selection of the radio buttons being changed.
Screenshot: Replacing the standard JRadioButtons with custom images
Screenshot: The JProgressBar example
Screenshot: The JList example
Screenshot: Implementing a scrollable JList
Screenshot: Using the JTable
Screenshot: Using the JTree
Screenshot: Adding nodes to our JTree in the example
Screenshot: The JEditorPane example app
Screenshot: The Option Panes Example app
Screenshot: The message dialog
Screenshot: The warning dialog
Screenshot: The error dialog
Screenshot: The input dialog
Screenshot: The confirmation dialog
Screenshot: The component dialog
Screenshot: Using a menu
Screenshot: Using tool tips
JaVa
Comments